Water Testing

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What is Water Testing?

Water is at the core of our business. Not only are we responsible for testing drinking water for more than one third of New Zealand’s population, but we are a division of Watercare Services – the fifth largest company in New Zealand by asset value. Watercare provides high quality drinking water and efficient wastewater services to 1.7 million customers every day. 

Our expert team provide water service providers, local government authorities, businesses, and residential customers with comprehensive testing of drinking water, wastewater, stormwater, trade waste, environmental and recreational waters. Our testing is carried out to the highest international standards by experienced professionals working right here in New Zealand.

Water Specialties

Lady drinking water from a glass

Drinking Water

We’re registered with the Ministry of Health and internationally accredited to carry out a range of tests on water sources. Read more here.

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Wastewater being treated at a water recycling plant

Wastewater

We perform a variety of tests on wastewater for treatment plant operators across the country. Read about what we can test for here.

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Heavy rain water going down a storm drain

Stormwater

Rainfall that does not evaporate can pick up contaminants and end up in waterways. We perform a variety of tests on stormwater. Read more here.

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Guy on a canoe at sunrise, paddling in water

Environmental & recreational waters

Our microbiology and chemistry testing on these types of waters can be tailored to our customers’ needs. Read more here.

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Piles of big plastic waste compressed in big blocks

Trade Waste Discharge

We carry out confidential analysis for customers who need to comply with local authority discharge resource consents. Read more here.

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Conveyor belt, juice in glass bottles on beverage plant or factory interior, industrial manufacturing production line

Commercial & Industrial Process Water

We do test for agriculture, horticulture and viticulture businesses that want to understand the safety of the water they are using. Read more here.

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If you are unsure about which testing to choose, we can help you determine the right testing for your needs.

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Laboratory Testing Process

Water testing process infographic with 9 steps

Water Testing Capabilities

Microbiological

Microbial testing is necessary where human health is at risk of being adversely affected by biological pathogens, disease-causing bacteria, and other toxins.

Anions

An imbalance of anion content in water can cause environmental problems. Anions such as nitrates, sulfates, phosphates, chloride, fluoride, boron, and cyanide may be present at various concentrations in potable and wastewater and can pose toxic risks to aquatic systems. 

Nutrients

Nutrients—especially nitrogen and phosphorus—are key water quality parameters in environmental water. They can have significant direct or indirect impacts on plant growth, oxygen concentrations, water clarity, and sedimentation rates. 

Inorganics

Inorganic chemistry deals with synthesis and behaviour of inorganic and organometallic compounds. This field covers chemical compounds that are not carbon-based. 

Metals

Testing for metals in water is important because many heavy metals pose a threat to our health. Water testing for metals is to ensure drinking water is of high quality, to confirm limits prohibited in wastewater are being met, or to establish scale potential in water. 

Organics

Organic chemistry deals with the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation of carbon-containing compounds. Most organic compounds contain carbon and hydrogen, but they may also include any number of other elements (e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, halogens, phosphorus, silicon and sulfur). 

PFAS

PFAS is an emerging organic contaminant and is an increasing area of focus in environmental management given it’s link to adverse health effects.

Continuous Water Monitoring

Online monitoring is a major improvement in many types of water monitoring, the ability to view real time trends and changes over time gives a much more detailed view than discrete (grab) sampling.

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Water being poured into a glass

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